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How inaccessible websites could affect your vote

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In the wake of Australia's Federal election, Dr Scott Hollier looks at how voters with disability were disadvantaged by the websites and systems on offer.

Here in Australia we’ve recently had a Federal election and I must admit, I really enjoy them, especially polling day. As voting is mandatory, it’s a big community event and I find it exciting to go to the local polling place to vote and enjoy a sausage sizzle cooked up by local kids, using the opportunity to raise some money for their primary school. 


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Access grows in the Middle East

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Over the coming weeks Media Access Australia will be looking at how access to media and technology is growing in the Middle East, as CEO Alex Varley pays a visit to the Qatar Assistive Technology Centre, known as Mada.

Mada is a not-for-profit organisation that shares many values and roles with Media Access Australia.  Mada works directly with people with disabilities and focuses on developing resources and assistive technologies in the Arabic language.  An early project was translating our sociABILITY: social media for people with disability guide into Arabic.  Mada was established by the Supreme Council for Information and Communication Technology in 2010 and has additional

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New Amazon Kindle tablets to include accessibility

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After promising last year, Amazon announced on Wednesday that its new Kindle Fire HD and Kindle Fire HDX tablets will come with improved accessibility features.

Both the updated Kindle Fire HD and the new Kindle Fire HDX will run on the Fire 3.0 operating system (Fire OS 3.0) called ‘Mojito’. The OS is a version of Google Android and will allow Kindle Fire tablets to be compatible with some Android apps. While Kindle Fire HD will come with a 7 inch screen, Kindle Fire HDX will come in 7 inch and 8.9 inch options.

The accessibility features in Fire OS 3.0 include:

Digital media and technology: 

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UK broadcasters exceed access requirements

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The bi-annual report into the provision of captioning, audio description and sign language on British TV has been released by the media regulator Ofcom. The January to June 2013 report shows that most broadcasters are exceeding their access targets.

The UK system splits the broadcasters into three levels, all based on their audience share.  The biggest category is Level 1 broadcasters, which includes the main free-to-air channels such BBC, ITV, Channels 4 and 5 and the main subscription channels from Sky.


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