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3D printers to improve classroom access

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While not traditionally thought of as media, 3D printers are emerging as a new way for students to access learning and information.

Printing head of a FELIX 3D Printer

Increasingly affordable devices can ‘print’ three dimensional objects with computer-based 3D ‘maps’ of everything from chemical compounds, microorganisms, topographical maps, to bodily organs and machine parts.

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Ofcom releases first access report for 2014

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The UK communications regulator Ofcom has released its Television Access Report for the first half of 2014, which shows that once again, most British broadcasters are exceeding their access requirements. The report comes as the Federal Government is trying to end similar reporting requirements which are in place for Australian broadcasters.

Girl watching TV


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Curtain call for Stagetext CEO Tabitha Allum

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For the last decade, UK arts captioning organisation Stagetext has been led by the dedicated and talented Tabitha Allum. Tabitha steps down from her role as Chief Executive this month and as a leader in the field of accessible arts, Media Access Australia would like to bestow one final title upon her: Expert in Access. Read on to learn why.

Stagetext CEO Tabitha Allum


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Online retail web accessibility guide

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Now that a legal case has been brought against Coles for a lack of web accessibility of its online shopping site, and that a similar case in the US against online grocer Peapod has been settled, it’s time for online retailers to act on improving access for people with disabilities.

Man browsing website on a MacBook Air


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Q&A Gilbert + Tobin’s Darren Fittler

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Media Access Australia spoke with Gilbert + Tobin’s Darren Fittler about his nomination for the 2014 Australian Human Rights Commission’s Human Rights Awards, challenges in media access, and his 40 by 40 challenge.

Portrait of Darren Fittler


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2014 Access All Areas film festival starts soon

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The annual Access All Areas Film Festival brings accessible screenings of the best new Australian films to venues near you. The festival travels to Parramatta, Casula and the Sydney city centre from 1-5 December and includes open captioned and audio described sessions.

Access All Areas Film Festival logo


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Access 2020 predicting the future – five experts, 20 ideas

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A highlight of the recent the Languages and the Media Conference in Berlin was a panel presentation speculating about what access might look like in the year 2020.

Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley presenting at the Languages & The Media Conference 2014. Credit: ICWE GmbH / Mark Bollhorst

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Senate committee seeks submissions about caption changes

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The Senate committee which is looking at the Government’s recently proposed changes to caption regulations is seeking submissions by interested parties.

Parliament House, Canberra, with lights on at dusk

The proposed changes are part of the Broadcasting and Other Legislation Amendment (Deregulation) Bill 2014, which was read into the House of Representatives on 22 October 2014. They include:


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Hong Kong art for everyone, By ALL Means

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Media Access Australia recently met with staff from Arts with the Disabled Association Hong Kong (ADAHK) during their visit to Australia for the Arts Activated conference. Both organisations were able to share experiences in delivering accessible arts programs to diverse audiences.

香港展能藝術會 Arts with the Disabled Association Hong Kong logo

ADAHK was formed in 1986 as a result of the first Hong Kong Festival of Arts with the Disabled. Promoting arts for everyone takes on a two-directional and complementary approach for the organisation: horizontal and vertical.


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UK VOD industry has two years to deliver captions or face regulation

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The video on demand (VOD) industry in the United Kingdom has two years to prove that it can deliver reasonable access for deaf people or it will face the government introducing mandatory regulation. This was one of the key discussions at The Future of Subtitling Conference held in London on 10 November 2014.

Silhouette of a man pointing remote control towards multiple screens


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