News

Help us improve our website

no
Show on home page

In an effort to provide the most relevant information on the most accessible website we can, Media Access Australia is seeking feedback from readers about our website. 

The simple 5 minute survey is an opportunity to tell us what you are interested in and what you would like to see more of on our site. Importantly, you can also let us know how you find the website’s accessibility.

“Our readership is incredibly diverse in terms of people’s interests and needs as users. Every day we talk to people who might be using a piece of assistive technology that radically changes how they experience the site. Gaining insight into that is vital for us being the best we can be,” said Online Editor Eliza Cussen.

Taxonomy: 

Top of page

ACMA seeks input from the public

no
Show on home page

Australia’s media regulator, the Australian Communications Media Authority (ACMA), is seeking members of the public to apply to sit on its Consumer Consultative Forum. People from diverse backgrounds, including those with disability, are encouraged to apply.

The Forum is intended to help inform the ACMA of consumers’ interests relating to telecommunications and the internet.

The announcement from the ACMA states: “We’re looking for a diverse field of representatives to help raise a wide range of consumer issues.” People representing the following consumers are particularly encouraged to express their interest:


Top of page

Telstra Pay TV applies for caption exemptions

no
Show on home page

Telstra Pay TV has applied to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) for exemptions to caption requirements for its subscription service Mobile Foxtel, which delivers 34 Foxtel channels to mobile devices.

Amendments to the Broadcasting Services Act passed in 2012 introduced captioning requirements for subscription TV services. However, the ACMA has the power to grant exemption or target reduction orders to television services if providing captions for them would cause ‘unjustifiable hardship’.


Top of page

Window-Eyes screen reader made free to Office users

no
Show on home page

The market for screen readers, software which converts text on computer screens to synthetic voice, is becoming more competitive and people who are blind are beginning to see huge benefits. Last week, GW Micro announced it would make its Window-Eyes screen reader free to users of Microsoft Office.

The announcementstates that Window-Eyes will be available globally to anyone using Microsoft Office 2010 or later, saving users from paying $1,022. GW Micro states that the decision was a result of an increasingly critical need for people who are blind or vision impaired to have reduced barriers to technology access.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News