Web

Australian web accessibility awarded

no
Show on home page

The winners of the Australian Web Awards have been announced, recognising the importance of accessibility in web development and design.  The Cerebral Palsy Alliance took out the national award for best overall accessibility for its main website.

"We're delighted that there's a growing recognition of the importance of web accessibility in Australia," said Robyn Cummins, Manager of the Communication Design Team at Cerebral Palsy Alliance." With one in five Australians with a disability and a rapidly ageing population, it should be on every organisation's agenda."

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

NVDA 2015.1 screen reader released: hands-on first impressions

no
Show on home page

NVDA, the free screen reader for Windows which is one of the world’s most popular, continues to receive significant improvements with the latest version, 2015.1. Dr Scott Hollier provides a hands-on review and initial impressions of the latest software update from NV Access.

Headset resting next to a Windows-based laptop

While not a proficient screen reader user, I find it useful from time to time when trying to read web pages, documents and emails which are text-heavy, so I was interested to take the new version of NVDA for a spin on my Windows 8.1 machine.


Top of page

Bloggers encouraged to audiocast their posts

no
Show on home page

A campaign has been launched to encourage bloggers and other online content creators to provide audiocasts with their posts. Speak Your Word, an initiative driven by filmmaker, photographer and writer Miguel Cano, seeks to provide the global blind and vision-impaired community with a more human experience of the web.

Speak Your Word logo

Audiocasts, also known as podcasts, are audio files commonly presented as voice recordings and broadcasts available to stream or download via the internet.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

ACMA reports on Australians’ online video use

no
Show on home page

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has issued a report which looks at the different ways that Australians are viewing TV programs, with the catch-up TV services being particularly popular. This highlights the need for captioning on these services.

Man sitting back on couch with hands interlocked behind his head, watching TV. Image credit:  D.Reichardt, Flickr


Top of page

Coles web accessibility case settled

no
Show on home page

The case against grocery retailer Coles, for the alleged inaccessibility of its online shopping service, has been settled.

Miniature shopping cart resting on a laptop keyboard. Image credit:  Tim Reckmann, Flickr

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Harvard & MIT sued over lack of captions

no
Show on home page

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are being sued for the alleged discrimination against people who are Deaf or hearing impaired by failing to caption the videos they provide online, such as in the universities’ popular Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

Exterior shot of Harvard's Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library, students walking around nearby


Top of page

YouTube admits automatic captions have a way to go

no
Show on home page

Google’s YouTube has admitted that it needs to work harder to provide better quality automatic captions for content uploaded to its video streaming service.

YouTube logo on a frame of a filmstrip

In comments made to the BBC, YouTube said that, while it believed having automatic captioning for video content was better than have no captioning at all, there was still plenty of room for improvement.


Top of page

YouTube embraces HTML5

no
Show on home page

The accessibility of Google’s YouTube video service looks set to improve thanks to the recent decision by the internet giant to abandon Adobe’s Flash technology in favour of the fifth and final version of the Hyper Text Markup Language, HTML5.

HTML 5 logo

In a recent blog post, YouTube Engineering Manager Richard Leider wrote that this was largely due to a maturing of HTML5—a core technology underpinning the web, and as at late 2014, an official Word Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Recommendation.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Web