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Australian web accessibility awarded

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The winners of the Australian Web Awards have been announced, recognising the importance of accessibility in web development and design.  The Cerebral Palsy Alliance took out the national award for best overall accessibility for its main website.

"We're delighted that there's a growing recognition of the importance of web accessibility in Australia," said Robyn Cummins, Manager of the Communication Design Team at Cerebral Palsy Alliance." With one in five Australians with a disability and a rapidly ageing population, it should be on every organisation's agenda."

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Progress with accessibility needed in New Zealand

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121 students took over New Zealand’s Parliament to debate about ‘Accessible Web Pages and Apps’. This was a mock bill aiming to improve accessibility in NZ.

Close up of person in a lecture browsing their laptop


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G3ict acquires IAAP in global accessibility merger

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The Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict) has announced it will be acquiring the International Association of Accessibility Professionals(IAAP) in a merger aimed at promoting the accessibility profession on a more global scale.

Image of an accessibility button on a laptop keyboard


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USAA’s new banking app allows voice-guided cheque depositing

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USAA, a Texas-based Fortune 500 diversified financial services group, has recently demonstrated that banking and accessibility can easily go hand in hand with each other. This was proved in a recent update to their banking app which will mean that individuals who are blind or have a vision impairment will hear the benefits – literally.

USAA logo

This system offers verbal cues to guide a vision impaired customer to be able to properly position a cheque to deposit it. They use commands like ‘push out’, ‘pull in’, ‘move right’, ‘lift device’, ‘hold steady’, ‘image captured’, and more.


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Google announces Android Nougat with new accessibility features

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Google has officially launched its new version of Android 7.0 Nougat which will feature a number of significant accessibility additions and improvements.

Android robot waving and standing on a pile of nougat

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Google invests in start-up that identifies images through your phone’s camera

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Google has said “oui” (yes) to buying French start-up Moodstocks, a company that specialises in rapid object recognition from smartphones. This interest from Google is further proof that the world of accessibility is going mainstream.

Google logo

Google already has an object recognition app (Google Goggles), but Moodstocks operates differently. It runs on your smartphone rather than via a server, which makes it more affordable, more mainstream and more accessible to its targeted audience.


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New free technology resource for teachers of the Deaf

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Australian not-for-profit, Conexu Foundation, has developed a free resource guide for teachers aimed at students who are Deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired, entitled ‘11 easy to use technologies to enhance learning in your classroom'.

Front cover of the teacher resource with the words ‘Download Now!’

The new resource has been designed for teachers in mainstream public, Catholic and private schools where children with these disabilities attend, and allows educators to find the latest on relevant communication technology.


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Governments are toughening up on public sector web accessibility

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State and Federal Governments around the globe are toughening up on public sector web accessibility. The latest case is the Alaskan Juneau School District, which felt the wrath of that state’s Government because of a complaint from the public that their websites aren’t inclusive for all needs.

close up of a man writing on some documents

After receiving the disability discrimination complaint, Alaskan authorities undertook a rigorous investigation and found out that ten other schools, educational groups, and institutions (including the Montana School for the Deaf and blind) also had accessibility issues on their websites.


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