Captions

Captions can help address disability education funding crisis

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New data has been released showing that Australian schools are struggling to fund the educational support needs of students with a disability. For schools looking for low-cost ways to support learning, especially for students with a hearing impairment, using captions on classroom videos offers essential access to the curriculum.

Teacher and students in a primary school classroom

Recent research conducted by the Australian Education Union (AEU) through the State of Our Schools Survey questioned 3,300 teachers and principals about funding for students with disability.


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Netflix launches in Australia with captions

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The US-based video-on-demand (VOD) service Netflix launched in Australia today. The good news for Deaf and hearing impaired viewers is that virtually all the content is captioned.

Netflix logo placed inside the shape of Australia


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New caption quality rules take effect in the US

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The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has introduced new quality rules for closed captions on television which come into effect in the US on 16 March 2015.

Left hand pointing remote control towards TV. Image credit: flash.pro via Flickr


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Caption reporting retained as communications amendment bill passes House of Reps

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A bill to amend sections of the Broadcasting Services Act, including some sections relating to captioning, was passed in the House of Representatives last night. However, amendments to the original bill mean that broadcasters will have to continue reporting on captioning compliance, while a scheduled review of the captioning rules will go ahead.

Young girl watching TV. Image credit: Mr Jan, Flickr


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Red Bee publishes results of caption survey

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The captioning provider Red Bee Media Australia has published the results of a survey it conducted about the positioning of captions on the Seven Network program My Kitchen Rules.

My Kitchen Rules logo


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ACMA reports on Australians’ online video use

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has issued a report which looks at the different ways that Australians are viewing TV programs, with the catch-up TV services being particularly popular. This highlights the need for captioning on these services.

Man sitting back on couch with hands interlocked behind his head, watching TV. Image credit:  D.Reichardt, Flickr


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Harvard & MIT sued over lack of captions

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Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are being sued for the alleged discrimination against people who are Deaf or hearing impaired by failing to caption the videos they provide online, such as in the universities’ popular Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

Exterior shot of Harvard's Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library, students walking around nearby


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Senate committee reports on proposed captioning changes

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The Senate committee which reviewed the Government’s proposed amendments to the Broadcasting Services Act, including changes to the captioning provisions, has issued its report. It has supported all but one of the proposed changes, including an end to the requirement that free-to-air networks need to make annual captioning compliance reports. The only amendment it has rejected is the cancellation of a scheduled review by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), although it recommends this be delayed by three years.

Fine tip pen resting on a printed document


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Think ‘Smart’ – IEP goals for access

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Part of the core work for teachers is to create learning goals for their students, on a class and at times individual basis. It is imperative that teachers include goals for all students in regard to access to media and technology, to ensure access to the curriculum.

Young boy in a classroom pressing down on a tablet device

Digital media and technology: 

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YouTube admits automatic captions have a way to go

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Google’s YouTube has admitted that it needs to work harder to provide better quality automatic captions for content uploaded to its video streaming service.

YouTube logo on a frame of a filmstrip

In comments made to the BBC, YouTube said that, while it believed having automatic captioning for video content was better than have no captioning at all, there was still plenty of room for improvement.


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