Captions

NSW Premier’s Teacher Scholarships awarded

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On Saturday 30 August, 22 teachers were awarded NSW Premier’s Teacher Scholarships across a range of subject areas and disciplines at Parliament House, Sydney. Media Access Australia’s Education Manager was among them.

Our Education Manager, Anne McGrath also works as an Itinerant Teacher of the Deaf with the Catholic Education Office, Sydney. McGrath was awarded the 2014 Premier's IOOF Centre for Educational and Medical Research Itinerant Support Teacher (Hearing) Scholarship by the Premier, Mike Baird, and the NSW Minister for Education, Adrian Piccoli.


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ACMA finds Nine cricket coverage breached caption quality rules

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has found that segments of Channel Nine Cricket broadcast in January 2014 breached its caption quality standard.

The ACMA’s standard, which came into effect in July 2013, states that captions must be readable, accurate and comprehensible. The breaches related to the pre-game segments of programs which went to air on 12 and 17 January.


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Did you know: One Deaf lawyer helped increase access for all Deaf Canadians?

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In 2000, Vancouver lawyer Henry Vlug lodged a complaint against the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) for not including closed captions on all of its television programs.

Vlug stated he could not enjoy programs such as major league baseball playoff games without the inclusion of captions, arguing that Deaf Canadians are equal to those who can hear since their taxes funded the broadcaster, entitling them to the full experience of CBC programming.

The case was won and the lawyer granted CAD$10,000 by the CHRT for pain and suffering. CBC appealed the tribunal’s settlement but later dropped the bid when it settled with Vlug out of court for a lower amount.


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How fast should captions be?

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A recent article by Diana Sanchez, General Manager of Red Bee Media Spain, looks at one of the perennial areas of debate about captioning— the optimum speed for captions on television.

In the article, Sanchez notes that studies have shown that some people have difficulty reading captions because they are too fast, yet they have consistently become faster over the last 30 years, and asks why this has happened.

The answer, writes Sanchez, is that whenever caption providers or other bodies that draw up quality standards consult organisations which represent the Deaf and hearing impaired, the latter will generally push for captions which are closer to verbatim.


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Teacher information (hearing)

Teachers work with a diverse range of student needs, learning styles and a curriculum that presumes the use of audiovisual/multimedia content.

It is vital that teachers who have students who are Deaf or have hearing impairment in their classrooms create an equitable educational environment through the use of inclusive teaching practices.


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When captioned content is not available

Having trouble finding captioned content?

If there is educational audiovisual content that you wish to use with students but you can’t find a captioned version, perhaps you could try:


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Importance of a quieter classroom

Students who are Deaf or have hearing impairment have difficulty hearing speech in background noise, over distances, and through AV equipment.

All students need a sufficiently quiet environment to listen and to make any meaning from the content. The following listening skills are important:


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Teachers asked to switch on captions for literacy and learning

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It’s National Literacy and Numeracy Week (NLNW) and Media Access Australia is encouraging all educators to switch on captions in the classroom through its annual cap that! campaign.

Beyond access to the soundtrack for students with hearing impairment, captions can provide focus, word association and increased comprehension skills for a wide range of students. The benefits of captions on educational videos, presented in a variety of research, signifies that switching them on provides a comprehensive method of learning.


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Caption reports hide great access story

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Why is it that our communications regulator seems satisfied to hide great achievements in access by our free-to-air television stations? Commentary by Alex Varley.

Developments that benefit viewers, stations, advertisers and content providers should be celebrated and publicised. Instead the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) puts out reports that hide innovation and the power of the market to deliver more under a spirit of healthy competition.


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