Education

Captioned video and transcripts – ideal access and teaching combination

no
Show on home page

For students with diverse learning needs, the use of captioned content in the classroom is the best way to gain access to context and information for learning experiences using media. When captions are not available, the fall-back position for teachers has often been the use of transcripts.

Student writing the word 'plant' on an interactive whiteboard, alongside the words Irrigation, gardener, farmer, water, soil and fertilising. The caption reads 'will consolidate your message.'


Top of page

Five key captioning roles for specialist educators

no
Show on home page

Specialist education roles, such as Itinerant or Supporting Teachers of the Deaf, have a strategic and practical role in promoting the use of captions in school.

Smiling teacher standing in a classroom, holding a folder in her right hand

Five key roles you can play are:

1. Broadening the reach of access services to others


Top of page

Choosing captioned options is an essential first step

no
Show on home page

In many subjects, students (and teachers) have a choice about which texts or resources to study. For students who use captions, it makes sense to choose texts or resources that have captioned film versions available.

Finger pointing to the text "English Captions: Yes [Descriptive subtitles for the hearing impaired]" on the back of a DVD box


Top of page

Using captions to teach skills and concepts

no
Show on home page

Access and opportunity combine with the use of captioned video in the classroom to provide necessary context, as well enduring information, after the initial learning experience passes.

Considering that captions are really just words used in a particular way to provide access and meaning, it challenges us as educators to ponder how we can use the opportunity these words provide. The written word has been used to teach concepts for thousands of years, so let’s look at words in the context of access. The use of captioned video ‘turns a light on’ to expose the hidden treasure – information – which lies within the video. Further learning for all students can be facilitated by releasing that knowledge in a variety of forms.


Top of page

Captioned Discovery Kids helps primary children learn

no
Show on home page

Discovery Kids is Australia’s only dedicated educational channel for primary-school aged children (5-12) and a sponsor of Media Access Australia's national CAP THAT! campaign. From its launch on Foxtel in 2014, 100% of the content on Discovery Kids has been captioned.

Robert Irwin speaking with the caption "No? Well, that's where closed captioning comes in"


Top of page

Captioning helps ASD students

no
Show on home page

One of the identified audiences for Media Access Australia’s CAP THAT! campaign is students with diverse learning needs. This includes students who have an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which represents about 0.5% of Australians according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics SDAC Survey1.

Ai-Media live captioner


Top of page

Captions aid literacy in the classroom

no
Show on home page

Worldwide studies have identified that captions can play a vital role in improving literacy levels of students. Improving reading skills is one of the main objectives for Media Access Australia’s CAP THAT! campaign, which targets all schools and all classrooms across Australia with the simple message: turn the captions on when playing television or video content in the classroom.

High school aged girl writing on paper in classroom with other students


Top of page

Captions help one third of students in the classroom

no
Show on home page

Media Access Australia’s major education campaign CAP THAT! has launched for 2015.

CAP THAT! targets all schools and all classrooms across Australia with a simple message: Whenever you are watching television or video you need to turn on the captions. The impact can be significant as up to one in three students in a classroom can benefit from using captions.

The CAP THAT! campaign runs for the next three months, finishing with National Literacy and Numeracy Week (31 August – 6 September). Improving literacy is one of the identified benefits of captioning. 

Taxonomy: 

Top of page

Captions can help address disability education funding crisis

no
Show on home page

New data has been released showing that Australian schools are struggling to fund the educational support needs of students with a disability. For schools looking for low-cost ways to support learning, especially for students with a hearing impairment, using captions on classroom videos offers essential access to the curriculum.

Teacher and students in a primary school classroom

Recent research conducted by the Australian Education Union (AEU) through the State of Our Schools Survey questioned 3,300 teachers and principals about funding for students with disability.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Education