Education

Teacher information (hearing)

Teachers work with a diverse range of student needs, learning styles and a curriculum that presumes the use of audiovisual/multimedia content.

It is vital that teachers who have students who are Deaf or have hearing impairment in their classrooms create an equitable educational environment through the use of inclusive teaching practices.


Top of page

Support and hearing information services for parents

There are a significant number of national and state-based organisations and websites that offer support services and information for parents, teachers and students.

National

Australian Hearing

Australian Hearing caters for people of all ages through a national network of hearing centres; including more than 110 permanently staffed centres, with 330 other locations in urban, rural and remote areas of Australia.


Top of page

When captioned content is not available

Having trouble finding captioned content?

If there is educational audiovisual content that you wish to use with students but you can’t find a captioned version, perhaps you could try:


Top of page

Importance of a quieter classroom

Students who are Deaf or have hearing impairment have difficulty hearing speech in background noise, over distances, and through AV equipment.

All students need a sufficiently quiet environment to listen and to make any meaning from the content. The following listening skills are important:


Top of page

Teachers asked to switch on captions for literacy and learning

no
Show on home page

It’s National Literacy and Numeracy Week (NLNW) and Media Access Australia is encouraging all educators to switch on captions in the classroom through its annual cap that! campaign.

Beyond access to the soundtrack for students with hearing impairment, captions can provide focus, word association and increased comprehension skills for a wide range of students. The benefits of captions on educational videos, presented in a variety of research, signifies that switching them on provides a comprehensive method of learning.


Top of page

Google Glass flips the classroom

no
Show on home page

Students with disabilities at times require specialist technology in the classroom that is often relevant just for their use. With the yet to be released Google Glass wearable head mounted technology, that scenario appears to be ‘flipped on its head’, with the technology being marketed as mainstream.

Some stories about Google Glass help to explain the technology’s potential. Google Glass appears to provide an opportunity for consumers to access and engage in leisure and learning opportunities without significant access barriers. Telstra have been involved in a trial with b2cloud of prototype apps to support those with hearing or vision loss for use with Google Glass.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Hearing Awareness Week approaches with the promise of resources for teachers

no
Show on home page

Hearing Awareness Week (HAW), which runs from 24th to 30th August, provides a focus for all things relating to hearing health and access, and will be of special benefit for teachers who work with students who are Deaf or have hearing loss and their classmates. The activities, resources and discussion opportunities provide an encouraging environment and a reminder that there is a lot of support for teachers to improve and sustain accessible teaching practice throughout the year.

HAW has activities planned around the country. To start the ball rolling is the Australian Hearing Hub Open House this Saturday 23rd August, to raise awareness about healthy hearing and the services available at the Australian Hearing Hub.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Education