The arts

Real-time captioning glasses premiere at French arts festival

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Augmented reality (AR) glasses which project real-time, customisable captions and surtitles for viewers have debuted at the Avignon Festival in France, highlighting international growth potential for real-time captioning technology in accessible arts and live performances.

Augmented reality (AR) captioning glasses. Image credit: Theatre in Paris

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Developer discusses the creation of handheld audio description device

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In a recent interview, Bryan Gould, Accessible Learning and Assessment Technologies Director at the National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) in the USA, talked about the development of the Durateq, a handheld audio description device which is now in use in Disney theme parks.

Spaceship Earth structure at Walt Disney World's EPCOT theme park, illuminated at night


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Accessible Live Events call for papers

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The University of Antwerp is hosting a special international symposium on Accessible Live Events on 29 April 2016 and is seeking proposals for papers and presentations.

Audience cheering whilst facing the stage at a live performance. A person's hands are raised in the foreground making a 'heart' shape.


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Get in on the act of describing art for everyone

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Museum Victoria is seeking public contributions to help add value to its online collection of artifacts. In adding alternative texts to over 45,000 images via crowd-sourcing, the organisation is also inching towards meeting website compliance with WCAG 2.0 AA.

Describe Me logo


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Cinema and the arts highlights of 2014

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2014 had a number of highlights in the areas of cinema and the arts. Where cinema developments over the last few years could be considered full steam ahead, as anticipated, this year saw a slowing of progress as the rollout of digital screens has neared completion across English-speaking countries. That doesn’t mean accessible cinema progress has come to a complete halt though, with an exciting development in the US that could have flow-on effects worldwide.

3D representation of a film projector


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Curtain call for Stagetext CEO Tabitha Allum

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For the last decade, UK arts captioning organisation Stagetext has been led by the dedicated and talented Tabitha Allum. Tabitha steps down from her role as Chief Executive this month and as a leader in the field of accessible arts, Media Access Australia would like to bestow one final title upon her: Expert in Access. Read on to learn why.

Stagetext CEO Tabitha Allum


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Hong Kong art for everyone, By ALL Means

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Media Access Australia recently met with staff from Arts with the Disabled Association Hong Kong (ADAHK) during their visit to Australia for the Arts Activated conference. Both organisations were able to share experiences in delivering accessible arts programs to diverse audiences.

香港展能藝術會 Arts with the Disabled Association Hong Kong logo

ADAHK was formed in 1986 as a result of the first Hong Kong Festival of Arts with the Disabled. Promoting arts for everyone takes on a two-directional and complementary approach for the organisation: horizontal and vertical.


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American theatre takes audio description to a new level

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Arena Stage in Washington DC has partnered with the American Council of the Blind to expand its established audio described theatre program to every performance of upcoming productions Fiddler on the Roof and Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike.

Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater, Washington, DC


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Digital Theatre productions with captions

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UK not-for-profit captioning organisation Stagetext has partnered with on-demand live arts service Digital Theatre to offer captioned versions of theatre productions.

A digital theatre production is where the play is recorded live and then distributed online, like a ‘film’ of the theatre performance. The addition of captions means that these productions are accessible to Deaf and hearing impaired people around the world.  This is part of the push to provide a different form of physical access when a person cannot attend the performance at the venue.  It also means that the performance is available multiple times and can be watched when the viewer chooses.


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