Deaf or hearing impaired

Affordable access opportunities for Australia

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At the ACCAN National Conference on 2 September, Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley joined a panel to discuss challenges for the telecommunications industry around affordability.

Mature man using a smartphone outdoors

According to Varley, the opportunities are waiting to be tapped in servicing the almost 20% of the population with a disability who have mainstream needs. He outlined five key issues to consider:


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Several hundred million reasons captions boost literacy

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The use of captions to help with literacy is supported by a range of studies and approaches. As we approach National Literacy and Numeracy Week and the culmination of the CAP THAT! campaign, we contrast two studies on captions and literacy—a small-scale American study and a massive program in India targeting hundreds of millions.

Key attached to keychain with the word 'literacy'


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Dr Scott Hollier talks affordable access at ACCAN 2015 National Conference

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Media Access Australia’s Dr Scott Hollier will be presenting at next week’s Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) National Conference, Dollars and Bytes: Communications affordability now and tomorrow.

ACCAN Dollars and Bytes: Communications affordability now and tomorrow. National Conference: 1st & 2nd Sept 2015


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ACMA to host a conversation on live captioning

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) is holding a one-day event on 15 September, Live captioning: let’s talk, that will provide an opportunity for representatives from industry, government and consumers to discuss the state and future of live captioning.

Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) logo


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Including captioning for excursions

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The principles of CAP THAT! don’t have to stop at the school gate. There are options for including captioning as part of an excursion; it just requires a little research and planning beforehand.

Teacher and six primary school students standing outside a building


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A world of access at Media for All

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Access to media is a growing feature at international conferences. A problem for Australian audiences is that these conferences are usually located in Europe or North America and tend to feature experts and case studies only from those regions of the world.

Sphere comprised of multiple images with light emerging from its centre


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How does captioning help with inclusive education?

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Inclusive education is an expectation for any student enrolled in a mainstream school, which is the case for the vast majority of Australian school students who have a disability.

Teacher and four primary school students using a laptop


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Kodi 15.1 media centre software significantly improves accessibility features

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Kodi, arguably the world’s most popular open-source media centre software, has recently introduced significant accessibility improvements in its 15.1 development update.

Kodi logo

The media centre software, formerly known as Xbox Media Center (XBMC), is currently being updated  to include a specific accessibility section relating to video playback of captions and selectable audio streams, as well as the ability to install audio menu support.

Digital media and technology: 

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Making access work in the New World

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Access to media through audio description and captioning is well established through most of Europe, North America and the English-speaking world. However, the situation in other parts of the globe is very mixed. Reporting in Australia is, not suprisingly, biased towards English language developments and advances. What is happening in other parts of the world, especially in Asia?

Globe of the world with Asia in focus

Digital media and technology: 

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U.S. Government makes captions compulsory in airports

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The Department of Transport has issued a ruling which will make it compulsory to turn on captions on all televisions and audio-visual displays in American airports.

People walking through an airport


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