News

Blind Arabic speakers left out in iOS 7

no
Show on home page

Blind Arabic speakers have identified that the quality of the screen reader has gone backwards in the latest update to the Apple iPad and iPhone software.

In the update to iOS 7, Apple removed the ‘Majed’ voice for the Arab language setting for VoiceOver and replaced it with the inferior ‘Tariq’ voice.

VoiceOver is the built in screen reader for all Apple devices which allows blind users to navigate their smartphone or tablet. VoiceOver can be controlled through a series of gestures useful for blind users who cannot see buttons or other visual elements on the screen.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Demonstrations of Kindle Fire accessibility feaures

no
Show on home page

The Royal National Institute for Blind People (RNIB) in the UK has released a set of videos demonstrating the accessibility features of Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets.

The first video, Kindle Fire for low vision users (embedded below), demonstrates how to customise the magnification, colour and font settings to make the tablet easier to use for people who are vision impaired.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3B1lTBKWjk

Watch the Kindle Fire for low vision users video with captions on YouTube


Top of page

Internet use higher among people with a disability in UK

no
Show on home page

More people with a disability are using the internet more frequently for social networking and job seeking than people without a disability, according to a report released by UK communications regulator Ofcom.

The report titled Disabled consumer’s ownership of communications services (PDF 530 KB) looks at how those with hearing, vision, mobility or multiple impairments use communications services and the internet.


Top of page

Americans push for accessible in-flight entertainment

no
Show on home page

Following on from the March 2013 introduction of the Air Carrier Access Amendments Act in the USA, a recent Senate hearing has heard statements that push for improvements to in-flight entertainment for Deaf and hearing impaired passengers.

As reported in USA Today, National Association of the Deaf’s policy counsel, Andrew Phillips, believes that American domestic airlines provide an inferior service to international counterparts.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News