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Ticketing websites inaccessible, report finds

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Music fans with disability face constant obstacles when buying tickets for performances and festivals, according to a report released by UK charity Attitude is Everything (AiE).

While three quarters of disabled people prefer to buy tickets online, only 20 per cent of venue websites cater for their access needs. Instead, people must rely on using premium rate phone lines, prove their disability and discuss their accessibility needs each time they buy tickets.


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ACMA makes no finding regarding Foxtel captioning complaint

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has made no finding in relation to a complaint made by a member of the public that an episode of Grand Designs Australia shown on Foxtel in June 2013 was only partially captioned.

Foxtel supplied the ACMA with a copy of the master recording of the program which showed that it was prepared with captions for broadcast, but did not have an “as transmitted” recording (which would have shown what the viewers saw). It had checked its records and there were no errors logged on the night of transmission, while no-one else complained about the lack of captions. Foxtel admitted that the lack of captions could have been caused by a technical fault that had remedied itself, but it was impossible to check this.


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Access conference comes to Brisbane

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Registrations for the 2014 Round Table on Information Access for People with Print Disabilities are now open. The annual conference focuses on how the changing technology landscape affects and benefits those with vision and perception related disabilities.

The theme of this year’s conference is ‘putting the person at the centre’. The program states that “Person-centred approaches empower people with a print disability by positioning them at the centre of policy, decision-making and service planning and delivery.” The four-day event covers topics such as Braille, web access, entertainment and education.


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Assistive technology promoted at the Super Bowl

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Microsoft has used its advertising slot at the American football championship (known as the Super Bowl) to shed light on how technology enhances the lives of people with disability.

Using the case study of retired football star Steve Gleason, the 60 second ad details how eye tracking software on a Microsoft Surface tablet can be used to by people with severely limited mobility to communicate.

Gleason was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 2011, and has since lost the mobility of his limbs and the ability to speak. Gleason communicates by focusing his eyes on a tablet computer with software that detects where he is looking. With this, Gleason is able to speak, write and even tweet.

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Most accessible game of 2013 announced

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The AbleGamers Charity, an international authority on video and computer game accessibility, has announced its awards for games and gaming devices released in 2013. The annual awards recognise games, consoles and controllers that were designed to include gamers with disability.

The awards named Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn the most accessible mainstream game of the year. The game allows gamers with physical and sensory disabilities to play online in a fully-accessible format. Producer of the game, Square Enix, confirmed that player feedback and continual updates are important parts of ensuring that the game is accessible. 

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