News

UK broadcasters exceed access requirements

no
Show on home page

The bi-annual report into the provision of captioning, audio description and sign language on British TV has been released by the media regulator Ofcom. The January to June 2013 report shows that most broadcasters are exceeding their access targets.

The UK system splits the broadcasters into three levels, all based on their audience share.  The biggest category is Level 1 broadcasters, which includes the main free-to-air channels such BBC, ITV, Channels 4 and 5 and the main subscription channels from Sky.


Top of page

The Android accessibility journey: a vision impaired user perspective

no
Show on home page

Despite the Apple iPhone leading in accessibility, many blind and vision impaired users eschew it in favour of Google Android phones. Dr Scott Hollier, who is legally blind, talks us through how he has made Android work for him.

In 2009 when the iPhone 3GS first appeared with a wealth of assistive features, it seemed like the Holy Grail of accessibility had been achieved. Before its launch the words ‘touch screen’ were often followed by ‘inaccessible’. But all of this changed when Apple bundled in the VoiceOver screen reader, the Zoom screen magnifier and the high contrast features into iOS.  

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

eReader producers continue fight to avoid accessibility

no
Show on home page

eReader manufacturers Amazon, Kobo and Sony have petitioned the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to seek  exemption from laws requiring products to be accessible to users with disabilities.

The issue for the companies centres around the 21st Century Video and Communications and Video Accessibility Act requiring any product offering ‘advanced communication services’ to be “accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities”.  However, the companies argue that their budget eReaders, including the Amazon Kindle, are used primarily just for reading, and therefore the Act should not apply. The companies argue that adding accessibility features would lead to products being more expensive, heavier and with shorter battery life.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Accessibility celebrated at game developer awards

no
Show on home page

The development of games designed to include people with disabilities will be recognised at this year’s Australian Game Developers Awards with the introduction of the Accessibility Award.

Presented at the Game Connect Asia Pacific (GCAP) conference, the awards recognise excellence and innovation in games developed in Australia. For the first time, they have added accessibility as an award category. According to the conference website, accessibility is defined as “mainstream games that make an effort to avoid unnecessarily excluding people with motor, cognitive, hearing speech or vision impairments.”

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News