Deaf/hearing impaired TV, DVD, Cinema & the Arts news

Captioned theatre funding program for US regional venues

no
Show on home page

American not-for-profit organisation Theatre Development Fund (TDF) is offering two-year partnerships to regional venues to provide open captioning of performances. The partnerships introduce new audiences to captioned theatre and inspire theatre companies to continue with a caption service at the partnership’s completion.

The partnerships, developed as the National Open Captioning Initiative, are funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the MetLife Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. The funding is put directly towards the service and its promotion, as opposed to providing a cheque to the partners.


Top of page

US regulator introduces new caption quality rules

no
Show on home page

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the USA voted unanimously on 20 February to approve new, comprehensive rules to ensure that closed captioning on TV is of the highest possible quality.

The new rules follow years of lobbying by Deaf and hearing impaired TV viewers and their advocates, including a July 2004 petition filed by several groups including Telecommunications for the Deaf “to establish additional enforcement mechanisms to better implement the captioning rules, and to establish captioning quality standards to ensure high quality and reliable closed captioning”. The petition resulted in 1,600 submissions to the FCC.


Top of page

ACMA makes no finding regarding Foxtel captioning complaint

no
Show on home page

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has made no finding in relation to a complaint made by a member of the public that an episode of Grand Designs Australia shown on Foxtel in June 2013 was only partially captioned.

Foxtel supplied the ACMA with a copy of the master recording of the program which showed that it was prepared with captions for broadcast, but did not have an “as transmitted” recording (which would have shown what the viewers saw). It had checked its records and there were no errors logged on the night of transmission, while no-one else complained about the lack of captions. Foxtel admitted that the lack of captions could have been caused by a technical fault that had remedied itself, but it was impossible to check this.


Top of page

Help us improve our website

no
Show on home page

In an effort to provide the most relevant information on the most accessible website we can, Media Access Australia is seeking feedback from readers about our website. 

The simple 5 minute survey is an opportunity to tell us what you are interested in and what you would like to see more of on our site. Importantly, you can also let us know how you find the website’s accessibility.

“Our readership is incredibly diverse in terms of people’s interests and needs as users. Every day we talk to people who might be using a piece of assistive technology that radically changes how they experience the site. Gaining insight into that is vital for us being the best we can be,” said Online Editor Eliza Cussen.

Taxonomy: 

Top of page

Telstra Pay TV applies for caption exemptions

no
Show on home page

Telstra Pay TV has applied to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) for exemptions to caption requirements for its subscription service Mobile Foxtel, which delivers 34 Foxtel channels to mobile devices.

Amendments to the Broadcasting Services Act passed in 2012 introduced captioning requirements for subscription TV services. However, the ACMA has the power to grant exemption or target reduction orders to television services if providing captions for them would cause ‘unjustifiable hardship’.


Top of page

Report looks at television access levels across Europe

no
Show on home page

A major report commissioned by the European Commission has found that levels of captioning, audio description and signing on television vary widely across Europe, and are highest in countries which have introduced legal or regulatory obligations. 

The Study on Assessing and Promoting E-Accessibility looked at accessibility levels in three areas – web, telecoms, and television – in the 27 member states of the European Union (EU), along with four comparison countries, Australia, Norway, Canada and the US.  For each country, the study looked at two public broadcasters and two commercial broadcasters.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Deaf/hearing impaired TV, DVD, Cinema & the Arts news