News

Vale Tammy Axelsen

no
Show on home page

It is with great sadness that we note the sudden death of Tammy Axelsen on 10 June at her home in Tasmania. Tammy was the dedicated administrator and organiser behind the Round Table for Print Disabilities.

Portrait photo of Tammy Axelsen

Under her care, the Round Table expanded to include broader forms of digital accessibility and information access, including access to video services through audio description.


Top of page

Government announces review of the ACMA

no
Show on home page

The Department of Communications is undertaking a comprehensive review of Australia’s communications regulator, the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), to ensure that the organisation is equipped to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing media landscape.

Silhoutte of a man pointing a remote control towards multiple screens


Top of page

Accessible trailers help you decide

no
Show on home page

Many movies are available with captions and/or audio description at cinemas, on DVD and some video-on-demand (VOD) services. But how do you decide whether the movie is the right one for you? Websites that feature accessible movie trailers are a good starting point.

Popcorn spilling out of a glass bowl onto a tablecloth, paper bag in the background


Top of page

Captioning helps ASD students

no
Show on home page

One of the identified audiences for Media Access Australia’s CAP THAT! campaign is students with diverse learning needs. This includes students who have an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which represents about 0.5% of Australians according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics SDAC Survey1.

Ai-Media live captioner


Top of page

Affordable Access secures grant funding

no
Show on home page

Media Access Australia has secured an Australian Communications Consumers Action Network (ACCAN) grant for its Affordable Access project, which will look at low-cost, mainstream accessible technology for people with disabilities with an aim to help people make more informed choices when it comes to devices.

Elderly person using a Samsung tablet device. Image credit: Wikipedia commons

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Android Wear 5.1.1 includes long-awaited accessibility features

no
Show on home page

The latest version of the Android Wear operating system version 5.1.1 includes several new accessibility features which allows wearable devices to become accessible for many users.

Accessibility icon highlighted in Android Wear 5.1.1 (under Location and above Screen Lock)

The new features are largely vision-related, with support for magnification, colour inversion and large text. The magnification feature can be accessed via specific gestures.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Chinese tech giant Baidu announces Blind Search device

no
Show on home page

China’s leading search engine provider Baidu has announced the Blind Search device, a tool to assist blind and vision impaired people access “massive amounts of information online through touch” using a combination of tactile and voice-activated commands.

Blind Search facing upward with light emitting from the tactile display. Caption reads 'The device is called Blind Search'


Top of page

Captions aid literacy in the classroom

no
Show on home page

Worldwide studies have identified that captions can play a vital role in improving literacy levels of students. Improving reading skills is one of the main objectives for Media Access Australia’s CAP THAT! campaign, which targets all schools and all classrooms across Australia with the simple message: turn the captions on when playing television or video content in the classroom.

High school aged girl writing on paper in classroom with other students


Top of page

UK disability advocates release roadmap for VOD accessibility

no
Show on home page

The accessibility of video-on-demand (VOD) services is a hot topic in Australia, the UK and other countries at the moment. There have been calls for legislation to be introduced unless the VOD services make acceptable progress in introducing captions and audio description voluntarily. But what constitutes accessible progress? In the UK, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), Action on Hearing Loss, and Sense (who represent people who are deafblind or have associated disabilities) have issued a report that attempts to answer that question.

Elderly couple watching TV together. Woman pointing remote at screen. Image credit: Defining progress for Access Services on Video on Demand (VOD)


Top of page

Californian government websites found to be inaccessible

Feature Item
Show on home page

The California State Auditor has reported that many government websites in the state continue to not be fully accessible to persons with disabilities, despite state and federal legal requirements and the growing use of government services online.

The June 2015 report from the Californian State Auditor, states that violations of web accessibility standards ranged in severity, some to the point that “…elements of the departments’ websites were completely inaccessible to users with disabilities while other violations may prevent persons with disabilities from completing tasks necessary to access certain online services.”

Taxonomy: 
Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News