Policy & Legislation

UK moves to measure live captioning

no
Show on home page

The UK broadcasting regulator Ofcom has announced that it will require television broadcasters to measure the quality of live captioning (known as ‘subtitling’ in the UK).

Live captioning refers to when the captions are created as the program goes to air. These are generally less accurate than captions created ahead of time.

Ofcom’s new approach follows extensive consultation with consumer groups, broadcasters and access suppliers and is part of Ofcom’s effort to comprehensively review the quality of live captioning and identify ways in which it can be improved. The measurement program will start later this year and requires samples to be analysed every six months for a period of two years.


Top of page

Captions improve learning: study

no
Show on home page

A case study conducted at San Francisco State University has found that student test scores and levels of comprehension improve when captions are turned on in university classrooms.

While captions are normally associated with providing access to videos for people who are Deaf or hearing impaired, there is growing evidence that they have literacy and learning benefits for everyone.


Top of page

Internet use higher among people with a disability in UK

no
Show on home page

More people with a disability are using the internet more frequently for social networking and job seeking than people without a disability, according to a report released by UK communications regulator Ofcom.

The report titled Disabled consumer’s ownership of communications services (PDF 530 KB) looks at how those with hearing, vision, mobility or multiple impairments use communications services and the internet.


Top of page

Americans push for accessible in-flight entertainment

no
Show on home page

Following on from the March 2013 introduction of the Air Carrier Access Amendments Act in the USA, a recent Senate hearing has heard statements that push for improvements to in-flight entertainment for Deaf and hearing impaired passengers.

As reported in USA Today, National Association of the Deaf’s policy counsel, Andrew Phillips, believes that American domestic airlines provide an inferior service to international counterparts.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Policy & Legislation