Online media

Australian web accessibility awarded

no
Show on home page

The winners of the Australian Web Awards have been announced, recognising the importance of accessibility in web development and design.  The Cerebral Palsy Alliance took out the national award for best overall accessibility for its main website.

"We're delighted that there's a growing recognition of the importance of web accessibility in Australia," said Robyn Cummins, Manager of the Communication Design Team at Cerebral Palsy Alliance." With one in five Australians with a disability and a rapidly ageing population, it should be on every organisation's agenda."

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Q&A: Accessible on-demand video services

no
Show on home page

Media Access Australia spoke with Dr Katie Ellis, Senior Research Fellow at the School of Media, Culture and Creative Arts at Curtin University ahead of her presentations on Netflix, audio description and captioning, and representations of disability in the media at the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA) conference in Melbourne.

The conference, being run at Swinburne University’s Hawthorn campus from 9-11 July, tackles a diverse range of issues in the media and communication space, including issues around disability and media access.


Top of page

Web accessibility vital to elections

no
Show on home page

Media Access Australia’s resident web accessibility expert, Dr Scott Hollier, has warned that a lack of accessible websites could lead to voters with disabilities potentially miscasting their votes at the next federal or state election.

Speaking ahead of his presentation on disability and digital divides, to be given at the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA) conference in Melbourne, Dr Hollier said that a lack of web accessibility could have profound effects on society.

“If you look at the last federal election as a case study, a voter with a disability would have had a very difficult time in gaining information to guide their votes based on the lack of accessibility of the websites of the major parties,” he said.


Top of page

ACMA releases data on teens’ web use

no
Show on home page

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has released statistics on how Australian teenagers use the internet, showing that almost all of them are connected, and demonstrating the importance of making web, applications and communications devices like smartphones and tablets accessible to people with a disability.

Aussie teens online is not only a great snapshot of the role the web plays in the lives of young Australians, but it is also valuable in helping web accessibility professionals as well as content authors, designers and developers think about how they need to make the web and devices accessible for the next generation of users.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Accessibility of online services grows: UN

no
Show on home page

The accessibility of online services around the world has dramatically increased in the last two years, according to United Nations (UN).

In its 2014 e-Government Survey, the UN stated that in the two years since its 2012 survey the percentage of government websites with information for “disadvantaged and vulnerable groups”, including people with disabilities, had grown from 28 per cent to 64 per cent.

This, the UN said, was due to the greater recognition by governments around the world of the enabling power of the internet and information and communications technology (ICT).


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Online media