Why accessible design is better design

By designing products, interactions and websites for people with a disability, we’re not just designing for a minority – we’re actually designing for everyone. Before I try to convince you that accessible design is better design, let me begin by correcting some myths about accessibility.

Lady texts with one hand and holds a coffee with the other
Lady texts with one hand and holds a coffee with the other

There are two myths that I want to bust; the first one is that being accessible means that a design must be boring, daggy, clunky or boxy. And the second myth I want to debunk is that you need to shelve your big ideas when ensuring that what you are doing is accessible to as many people as possible.

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Everyone has disability

Accessible design isn’t just designing for a minority group who identify as having a permanent ongoing impairment. At its core, accessibility is about designing for diverse user needs and it benefits everyone, because everyone has disability.

A group of diverse people
A group of diverse people

With the increased awareness around user experience, most newly-developed products, applications and websites undergo usability testing throughout the design process. Yet, there is a significant limitation to this testing, if it’s not done across a diverse range of people.

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Inaccessible websites force many to ‘click away’

New research indicates that UK businesses are losing out on huge sums of money – potentially totalling billions of pounds – by failing to make their websites accessible to users with access needs.

A British pound symbol inside a red slashed circle
A British pound symbol inside a red slashed circle

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