Sensory impairment

WA Accessibility Camp agenda now available

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The agenda for the WA accessibility camp to be held on 1 August 2014 is now available. The event is headlined with keynotes by Alec Coles from the Western Australian Museum based on the topic ‘An Accessible Museum for WA’, and MAA’s own Dr Scott Hollier speaking about recent advances on accessibility and cloud computing.

The full agenda is as follows:

9:15 – 9:30: Registration

Session 1 – Keynotes

9:30 – 9:45: Introduction (Morgan Strong)
9:45 – 10:15: An Accessible Museum for WA (Alec Coles)
10:15 – 10:45: Accessibility in the cloud (Dr. Scott Hollier)

10:45 – 11:00: Morning Break


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Print Disability Round Table: call for papers

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The Round Table on Information Access for People with Print Disabilities is now calling for presentation abstracts for its May 2014 event.

The Round Table focuses on how information can be made more available for those for whom print materials such as books and newspapers present a barrier. This includes people who are blind, vision impaired, have dyslexia or have limited dexterity.

The theme of the 2014 conference is ‘Information Access – Putting the person at the centre’. This explores how current systems and policy frameworks can be improved to put the needs of print disabled consumers first.


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Accessibility improvements announced at Apple WWDC

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A number of new features announced at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) held in San Francisco last week reveals some potential improvements to the accessibility of Apple devices. Presenting to developers, Apple unveiled its new operating system (OS), called OS X Mavericks, and the latest version of its mobile OS, called iOS 7.

Mavericks will come installed on Apple’s desktop computers and laptops including the iMac, Macbook Pro and Macbook Air, while iOS 7 will come installed on Apple devices such as the iPhone and iPad.

Digital media and technology: 

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Women with disability disadvantaged in ICT

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The digital divide experienced by people with disability is wider for women, new research finds. A report released by Women with Disabilities Victoria and the Self Advocacy Research Unit has found that the perception of women with disabilities being less capable of operating computers perpetuates disadvantage.

Access to information communications technology (ICT) including computers, mobile devices, social media and websites is becoming increasingly vital for participation in society. The research identifies a vicious cycle of disadvantage. Women with disability are more likely to face poverty, unemployment and under-education than their male counterparts. This means they are less likely to have access to ICT which, in turn, means they are less likely to overcome socioeconomic barriers.


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